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Packing for a Ski/Snowboarding Vacation

by Snow Travelista December 17 2013 0 Comments

Packing for a ski trip can be a challenge. Most of the clothes are bulky, and traveling with gear can be a hassle. Clothes make a difference between enjoying your trip and being miserable.

For snow-play, leave the cotton at home and stick to wool or synthetic fabrics. Once cotton gets wet, from either sweat or snow, it won’t dry out, leaving you damp and cold.

In general, you want to pack pieces that can be mixed and matched to keep you warm and looking good. Mid layers are a good example of something you can wear on and off the slopes. However, you may want to pack separate base layers for snow sports and relaxing, because if you’re like me, the skiing set will get stinky during the day.

On the slopes

Base: Your base layer should be wool or synthetic. A mid- to heavy-weight is good depending on the rest of your gear. I wore a heavyweight Capilene Patagonia base with my ski pants and stayed toasty and warm without a mid layer. On top, I used a synthetic base plus a mid layer.

Mid: You may or may not need this layer depending on the rest of your gear. Fleece works well. On top, I use a zipped jacket that I can open when I get warm. 

Outer: This includes your ski pants and jacket. Make sure this layer is waterproof, especially if you’re a beginning skier or rider, because you’ll spend a lot of time on your butt in the snow. Ski pants and jackets are insulated to varying degrees, which will influence which other layers you choose. My jacket isn’t insulated, so I really layer-up on top, sometimes using two light base layers and a mid layer underneath. My pants have some insulation built in so I only need the Patagonia bottoms.

If you don’t own, or want to pack, ski pants and coat, try using a rental service such as Get Outfitted. They will deliver the clothes to your hotel and you just drop them back in the mail before leaving using the enclosed mailer. They also rent Go Pros, goggles, and more.

The important-small-stuff:

In addition to your layers, on the slopes you’ll need gloves, ski goggles or sunglasses, a neck warmer such as a buff, cap, balaclava, or beanie that will fit under your helmet; and ski socks. Ski socks snuggly fitted and taller than regular socks making them a better choice with ski boots. Trust me; you don’t want socks bunching up inside of your ski boots, ouch! Hand and foot-warmers are a pleasure to have on really cold days. Buy them off the mountain for the best deal. Depending on the type of skiing you have planned, you may need a backpack and hydration options.

Off the slopes

You’ll be worn out by the end of the day, so pack some comfy clothes to relax in. Keep thinking in layers to give yourself more outfit options and save room. Again, they should include bases, mid-layers such as a snuggly fleece, and an outer layer. The difference is that the outer layer doesn’t need to be waterproof and the other could include some cotton such as jeans.

Base: I like a thin bottom base, such as silk, under my pants. Sometimes I skip this and just wear one layer after hours if I won’t be outside much.

Mid: This is the piece You’ll likely wear the most, so choose something that will pair well with all of your outfits and that fits comfortably. There are so many sharp looking options available, it may be hard to choose just one, but for the sake of space, try.

Outer: This can be any stylish coat, sized to fit a couple of layer underneath. By using layers, you can avoid packing your biggest, most bulky coat. Pick something that is wind and rain resistant for the most versatility.

The important-small-stuff:

Gloves, scarves and caps will round out your outfits without taking up much space. Make sure you pack some waterproof boots that can take a tromp through the snow. Sorel makes a bunch of options the get the job done while looking good. I didn’t feel like a Salt Lake City local until I owned a pair. Then I found out they make all-rubber high-heels, not my grandma’s idea of practical snow boots, but they rock!

And don’t forget…

Pack all of your usual travel items such as toiletries, undergarments, swimsuit, and maybe some sweats for the hotel room. A few more items you shouldn’t forget: sunscreen, snacks and lip balm with sunscreen. Sunscreen is very important due to the high elevation and reflection up from the snow. Make sure you protect your face and lips well.

What about gear?

You have a few options for gear. It can be a hassle to check your board, skis or poles on the airline for a short trip, so you might want to rent them. However, boots are an important piece that I would go ahead and pack. I’d also prefer my own helmet, which doesn’t take much space if you stuff it full of other items such as gloves and beanies.

Do research on rentals ahead of time, there are rental options both on and off the mountain that may even give you the chance to demo some new gear you’ve wanted to try. Some will even give you a discount for reserving online in advance.

If all of these new clothes and accessories sound expensive, read my post: Dressing for cold weather travel on a budget.

Don’t be the person who shows up in jeans and ends up miserable two hours into the lesson. Make time to “beg, borrow or steal” some decent clothes so you can focus on learning to ski, not trying to stay warm and dry.

To make your packing easier, use this downloadable Ski/Snowboard Vacation Packing List inspired by Alpine Ski Properties of Park City.

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Snow Travelista

About the Author

Snow Travelista

Erika Wiggins

Erika Wiggins is a freelance writer with a passion for travel and adventure sports. Last winter she visited Utah on assignment to learn to ski. Three months later, she packed up and moved to Utah so she could ski the Greatest Snow on Earth every season. Today she scours Utah’s ski scene looking for creative vacation ideas and tricks to make each visitor’s stay more epic. Planning a girls’ getaway or need a resort with childcare? Ask her for advice. Erika shares tips and inspiration, elevating ski vacations from ordinary to extraordinary. She is Ski Utah’s travel guru. Follow her on Instagram and Twitter as @Active_Explorer.

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