Sneaky Tips To Cheat The Cold

By Yeti \ February 24 2017

By: Harriet Wallis, The Geezer Gal

Cheat Your Hand Warmers 

Air activated, "shake 'em up" hand warmers keep your fingers toasty for 8 - 10 hours. But what do you do with them when you're done for the day?

I used to give them away in the locker room. People would snap them up for themselves or their kids. It was a shame to just throw them away when they had lots of heat left in them.

Voila! Here's a better way. Pull the warmers out of your gloves and wrap them tightly in Saran wrap or other generic plastic wrap. Don't skimp on the plastic wrap. Use plenty. Wrap them up like a mummy.


The wrap cuts off the air and they go dormant. You can store them wrapped tightly for several days. Then unwrap them and shake them to revive them. You can get 2 and sometimes 3 ski days out of the same set of hand warmers.

The down side is that you can only store them for a couple days. And occasionally they just don't revive.

I've experimented with zip lock baggies and aluminum foil. They don't work. Even if you squish it really well there's too much air left in a baggie. I have no clue why aluminum foil doesn't seen to work, but it doesn't. 

But before you stock up on a batch of hand warmers, check the expiration date that's stamped on the wrapper or the foil packet. It should be several years into the future, not just the coming year. Those that are close to expiration usually have less oomph.

 

Get Goofy With Head Warmers

Don't be boring. Show your sense of humor and keep your noodle warm at the same time. Silly masks or balaclavas make people laugh.

For years I've photographed fun masks on the ski slope. But some of the best ones showed up during the summer on a dusty road. A bunch of guys piled out of ATVs and they all were wearing masks against the flying dust. The lead guy bought a pack of 15 masks and gave them to all his friends. Every mask was different and very funny.

Don't want to look like a goofball out there with a head warmer? You'll also be surprised how much a thin-layered buff can be the difference in keeping you warm on a chilly day.  

Harriet Wallis has been a ski writer, editor and photographer forever. She learned to ski on a dare when she was in her mid 30s and has been blabbing about it ever since. Read more from Harriet at Senior Skiing http://www.seniorsskiing.com/  

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