Winging It: Utah Resorts Have Top Turkey Dinners

Pam's Plate

By Pam's Plate \ November 21 2014 \ 0 Comments

True story: I have a friend who cancelled her own Thanksgiving dinner, ending a years-long tradition of welcoming friends to her table, because she “wasn’t going to cook that damn tofurkey ever again!” She was tired of making two birds, two versions of every side dish—with and without dairy, etc.—in order to please one particular couple. So she feigned a family gathering that she “couldn’t miss” and headed west to face the in-laws. Tradition broken. Whatever your situation, you could make some memories this year by elevating your holiday experience. Reservations are recommended at all of these locations.

Alta

Alta Lodge

Prix fixe. Revved up standards as well as seasonal surprises, such as roasted fig and Humboldt Fog appetizers, and ahi poke and endive.  Organic farm raised turkey with apricot and wild rice dressing, pan gravy, cranberries and roasted root vegetables.  Vegetarians can enjoy sweet potato shepherd’s pie. Apple brie galette! Dinner: 6-8:30 p.m. $40 for adults, $20 ages 7-12 and $12 for ages 4-6.

Alta’s Rustler Lodge

Buffet with all the classics: Butternut squash soup, roasted turkey, honey baked ham, grilled salmon, traditional stuffing, sweet potatoes, mashers and gravy, green beans almandine, pumpkin pie, apple crisp and pecan tart. Enjoy a digestif by the central fire, overlooking Alta’s High Rustler, thus the name. Dinner: 4:30-7:30 p.m. $50.00 for adults, $20.00 for children 7-12 and free for children 6 and younger.

Canyons Resort

Canyons Grand Summit Hotel

An enormous buffet with too many delicious-sounding dishes to mention. How about brown-sugar brined turkey with cranberry chutney? Or High West whiskey and maple-glazed ham? Crispy sausage and chestnut stuffing? Dinner 12-5. Adults $55, 6-14 $22.

Deer Valley

The Brass Tag

Deer Valley’s newest restaurant (watch for more posts about this place!) is offering a “Dinner for Two” November 27 - November 30. The meal includes a roasted butternut squash and arugula salad, turkey breast roulade, brick oven Brussels sprouts with Niman Ranch bacon, Deer Valley caramelized garlic whipped potatoes, shiitake mushroom and green bean casserole. Finish with skillet pumpkin pie with lemon whipped cream. Dinner: 5:30-9 p.m. $48 per person

Snowbird

The Atrium

Always elegant, with a glorious mountain view.  Full-service buffet will feature slow-roasted turkey with mashed potatoes; hand-carved rosemary-encrusted prime rib and decadent desserts. Unconventional selections including blackened ahi and salmon-mango shooters. Dinner: 11 a.m. – 7 p.m. Adults $43, Children 7-12 $19, 6 and under free.

The Aerie
No matter what you’re having, there’s something on the award-winning wine list to complement your turkey. Mix up your holiday with a selection of sushi, seafood, carved herb-encrusted New York strip, lamb stew, carbonara with Australian lobster and a selection of desserts including molten chocolate cake.  Dinner: 11 a.m. – 8 p.m.  Adults $46, Children (6-12) $22.

The Lodge Bistro

Southern-style fried turkey, pancetta-wrapped salmon, or American Kobe bavette steak. Great wine list.  Regular Children’s Menu will be available. Dinner: 4-10 p.m. Adults $43, Children $22

Solitude

Honeycomb Grill

Chef Greg Neville has always been known for making food special. Entrees include butter roasted turkey breast with sage yams and country turkey gravy ($28); organic Piemontese beef roulade; wood oven-roasted Scottish salmon with celery root puree and lobster butter ($27); and a grilled stuffed “Duroc” pork chop with roasted pancetta Brussel sprouts in a pomegranate Pinot Noir pan sauce ($29). The pumpkin chiffon pie is the bomb, but how could one not be tempted by the chocolate and bourbon pecan pie? Dinner: 12-8 p.m.

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About
Pam's Plate

Pamela Olson is the Ski Utah Food Blogger. Pamela Martinson Olson is a freelance writer and former executive editor of Utah Homes & Garden magazine. A native Utahn, she grew up drawn to the natural world, camping in and hiking the state’s deserts and high mountain peaks. A birdwatcher and fly fisher, she’s become a passionate skier over the last few years, seeing mountains and snowstorms in an entirely different light. Pam will be writing about food, restaurants, and aprés.